Friday, January 29, 2010

ACHE deadline extended

This request comes from Jeffery Alejandro.

The ACHE Planning Committee needs presentation proposals for the 2010 ACHE Annual Conference and Meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico October 20-23, 2010. While we have received some wonderful proposals, we still need more. That being the case, the deadline for the Call for Proposals has been extended until Monday, February 15, 2010.

To download the Call for Proposals Form, visit http://www.acheinc.org/ache2010/call_for_proposals.pdf.

We want to have a great conference, but the value of the conference is based on the quality and quantity of presentations being offered. Proposed sessions should be submitted electronically as Word (.doc) or Rich Text (.rtf) documents by Monday, February 15. You should be notified on the status of your submission by April 15, 2010.

Remember, we can only be successful if you and your colleagues are an actively involved the conference. Feel free to share this email with others in your office and institution.

Please email your proposal to:

Dr. Jeffery Alejandro at alejandroj@ecu.edu

Thursday, January 28, 2010

J.D. Salinger Dead

J.D. Salinger Dies at 91: The Hermit Crab of American Letters - TIME

From TECHLAND

19 Rejected Names For The Apple iPad

More CE jobs from



HigherEd Jobs.ComAdult and Continuing Education Programs

Westchester Community College, Valhalla, NY
Program Administrator/Welcome Center Director 
Program Administrator/Director of the Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies
Program Specialist/Assistant Director, The Gateway Center

Durham Technical Community College, Durham, NC
Program Assistant, Continuing Education

University of Missouri, Columbia, MO
Assistant Director/Manager of Continuing Education

Edinboro University of Pennsylvania, Edinboro, PA
Director of Continuing Education (Position #10098138)

The perfect post-retirement continuing education

Job? At Central Washington University.  I know a few continuing educators with loads of experiential learning...

Program Assistant--Wine/Beer Education Programs - HigherEdJobs.com:

Job Summary: This position assists the Associate Director of Continuing Education and the World Wine Program manager in planning, organizing, and executing classes for the wine and beer education programs, training, events, marketing initiatives, product sales, inventory control, database management and other related duties. The incumbent utilizes technology to assist with information gathering, organization, reporting and delivery of services.

Are you an online resident

or visitor?  The Higher Ed Marketing blog outlines a useful distinction.

Natives/immigrants vs. residents/visitors

“The resident,” explains Dave White of the University of Oxford, who wrote the residents/visitors post, “is an individual who lives a percentage of their life online. The web supports the projection of their identity and facilitates relationships. These are people who have an persona online which they regularly maintain. … The web has become a crucial aspect of how they present themselves and how they remain part of networks of friends or colleagues.”

The visitor, on the other hand, “is an individual who uses the web as a tool in an organised manner whenever the need arises. They may book a holiday or research a specific subject. They may choose to use a voice chat tool if they have friends or family abroad. Often the Visitor puts aside a specific time to go online rather than sitting down at a screen to maintain their presence at any point during the day. They always have an appropriate and focused need to use the web but don’t ‘reside’ there. They are sceptical of services that offer them the ability to put their identity online as don’t feel the need to express themselves by participating in online culture in the same manner as a Resident.”

Information wants to be free

Colleges offer more free courses online tennessean.com The Tennessean

Mississippi going after

Tennessee border students.  It's interesting--they frame it as way to increase the state's population since 25% of the students attending Mississippi institutions end up living there.  I might have thought it was about money...

Mississippi colleges vie for border-line students» The Commercial Appeal

Facebook etiquette

Dear married men: Keep your distance - CNN.com

One woman said it best on my friend's Facebook comment thread: "If a married man is trying to cultivate a friendship with me and I don't know his wife, he's out of line and I want nothing to do with him. The last thing I need is a woman looking at me sideways thinking I'm interested in her man. I'm too grown for that kind of drama."
Drama is exactly what you get when a married man tries to befriend a single woman without mentioning his wife, much less an introduction. With that said, I'm declaring it is almost impossible for a married man to be friends with a single women if she doesn't know the wife.

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

I already hold the Internet in my hand

And it makes phone calls.  But this still looks pretty sweet...

Apple unveils $499 iPad tablet - USATODAY.com

Jobs unveils the very thin iPad tablet computer. Jobs claims it will offer the best browsing experience you can have, like "holding the Internet in your hands."

Armageddon

for traditional education?  Meteoric Growth.  Armageddon (1998).  Ba-doom Pshh.

Study: Online Education Continues Its Meteoric Growth - US News and World Report

Dances with Smurfs


is number one.  The plot may be mundane, but the experience is unique.  For a while, you are immersed in another world.

'Avatar' tops 'Titanic' with $1.859 billion at the box office

Groundswell talks about



the emergence of non-compatible technologies all using the interwebs. Are we at the doorway of a changed world? And, by the way, Splinternet is a great term...

The Splinternet means the end of the Web's golden age
Now with iPhones, Androids, Kindles, Tablets, and TVs connecting to the Web, that's not true. Your site may not work right on these devices, especially if it includes flash or assumes mouse-based navigation. Apps that work on the iPhone don't work on the Android. Widgets for FiOS TV don't work anywhere else.

Meanwhile, more and more of the interesting stuff on the Web is hidden behind a login and password. Take Facebook for example. Not only do its applications not work anywhere else, Google can't see most of it. And News Corp. and the New York Times are talking about putting more and more content behind a login.

Web marketing has grown since 1995, based on the idea that everything is connected. Click-throughs, ad networks, analytics, search-engine optimization -- it all works because the Web is standardized. Google works because the Web is standardized.

Not any more. Each new device has its own ad networks, format, and technology. Each new social site has its login and many hide content from search engines.

We call this new world the Splinternet (with a nod to Doc Searls and Rich Tehrani, who used the term before us with a somewhat different meaning). It will splinter the Web as a unified system. The golden age has lasted 15 years. Like all golden ages, it lasted so long we thought it would last forever. But the end is in sight.

I'll bet no one asked her what she was going to do

With that degree.

Teacher, 100, gets degree a day before dying

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Lumina Foundation

 just sent out an email with links to several reports that should interest continuing educators. View it here. You can find out more about the Lumina Foundation by visiting its home page

Making the case for workforce alignment

Revving the Education Engine from the Education Commission of the States, calls on education, policy and workforce leaders to re-examine how they leverage public investments in education to support state and regional economic and workforce goals. The report includes examples of promising policies and programs that help states align higher education as the arbiter of student supply and workforce demand.

Degree completion
Juggling work and college

Community college students are working too many hours at the expense of academic success, according to  Working Too hard to make the Grade from CALPIRG. Among the report's findings: Students work an average of 23 hours per week to cover college costs, while existing financial aid resources are underutilized.

Workforce development
Study: Worker retraining works

The majority of individuals who completed job retraining during the first 18 months of Michigan's No Worker Left Behind program either kept their jobs or secured new employment, according to a state review. No Worker Left Behind offers up to $10,000 over two years to workers who attend community colleges or other training programs. Read Michigan's No Worker Left Behind - Outcomes for the First 18 Months.

My iPhone's new sister





Sunday, January 24, 2010

Quebec Association for Adult Learning

Second Annual Conference
Boomers and Beyond
Thursday, February 25, 2010
Concordia University
Montreal, QC H3G 1M8
Tel: 514-848-2424 (2036)
E-mail: qaal@alcor.concordia.ca
For more information: http://doe.concordia.ca/qaal/

Friday, January 22, 2010

Illinois Council on Continuing Higher Education


And ACHE joint conference will soon be starting.

35th ANNUAL ICCHE CONFERENCE
IN PARTNERSHIP WITH ACHE GREAT LAKES REGION
Continuing Higher Education: First Responders in Finding Solutions
February 10-12, 2010
Doubletree Hotel Chicago - Magnificent Mile

Continuing educators have a long tradition of being in the front line of solving problems in higher education, willing to take chances and try new ideas.

Program Brochure: ICCHE Brochure

A voice in the wilderness


Needing only the governor's signature, Tennessee is set to implement a drastic change in how it funds higher education.  Of course, the devil is in the details, and the details are unknown at this time.  Two legislators voted against the reform, and one of them speaks out below, warning all of us who aren't UT.

Higher Education Funding Overhaul Goes to Bredesen
Rep. Gerald McCormick, R-Chattanooga, was one of the two “no” votes in the House. He said he has reservations about lawmakers moving so quickly in handing off funding formula changes to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission.
“We don’t know what the funding formula will do, but I suspect it’ll lean toward helping Knoxville (University of Tennessee-Knoxville) and (University of) Memphis to the disadvantage of all the other schools,” Rep. McCormick said, later noting, “I may be wrong, but we haven’t had time to figure it out.”
The General Assembly later Thursday night recessed its two-week special session on K-12 and higher education reform until Monday in order to ensure no major mistakes were made in the final, daylong flurry of activity.
A major feature of the higher education bill requires the Higher Education Commission to revamp the funding formula and reward schools that do good jobs of retaining students and, ultimately, getting them to graduate.
Tennessee currently ranks 40th in the nation when it comes to residents completing bachelor’s degrees and 45th in terms of associate degree completion, according to Complete College America, a non-profit group whose leaders have advised state officials.
Other bill provisions elevate the role of two-year community colleges and direct officials to develop and implement agreements outlining what course requirements are transferable between two-year and four-year schools.
Interestingly enough, our local newspaper suggests that the community college transfer legislation will apply to all universities except the flagship school, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.  Perhaps it's wrong, though; the article isn't available online.

More information on the legislation can be found here: Tennessee Lawmakers Pass Higher Education Bill.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

This is Healthy Weight


Week. Unfortunately, I am in no state to celebrate.

Healthy Weight Week

January 17-23, 2010
January 19, Tuesday – Rid the world of Fad Diets & Gimmicks Day

January 21, Thursday – Women's Healthy Weight Day

The 17th annual Healthy Weight Week is a time to celebrate healthy diet-free living habits that last a lifetime and prevent eating and weight problems. Our bodies cannot be shaped at will. But we can all be accepting, healthy and happy at our natural weights.

This Noel-Levitz study

looks at multiple student recruiting issues, including the following: How are students reaching your sight?  I wonder if the response would vary for adult students?  Do we underestimate how technologically savvy our older students are?  Do the few who need computer literacy remediation skew our over-all view of the population?



Before students can read about your campus, they have to find it. Google has long been synonymous with Internet searching, so it is no surprise that Google is the leading method for finding college Web sites:

How do you find a school online?

• Google or other search to find schools by name—41%
• Use a site to match me, like MyCollegeOptions or The College Board—38%
• Enter words or phrases into Google—35%
• Refer to a printed document with a URL—13%
• Use NCAA or other athletic site—5%
• Guess until I get it—4%
• Research on MySpace or Facebook—3%

Furthermore, 72 percent of students said that they land on a school’s home page after conducting a search.

These results highlight some challenges. First, it’s imperative to make sure that your campus
name and any associated search terms (such as programs or majors) come at the very top of
Google searches.

More challenging, though, is the lack of students using URLs from printed pieces to come to your campus. This doesn’t mean those print pieces are not generating interest or building awareness. However, it seems that even if students want to learn more about your campus after reading a print piece, they are not using the URLs included on that piece. This may present difficulties in tracking the effectiveness of print materials through URLs unique to that piece.

The first ACHE regional

conference.

ACHE Great Plains Regional Conference
Moving Forward: The Transition Continues
February 25- 26 2010
University of Central Missouri
Lee's Summit, Missouri

For more information visit the conference website at ACHE Great Plains 2010.  The last day for early bird registration is Friday, January 29.

Questions?  Please call/email Linda at:
(816) 347-1612 or lbachman@ucmo.edu

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Where the jobs are

Someone waits for me....

Where the jobs will be for this year’s grads

Job openings

For adult and continuing educators:

Vice President of Adult Studies, Montreat College, North Carolina http://www.montreat.edu/

Director, Continuing Education, Santa Barbara City College, California https://jobs.sbcc.edu/

Assistant Director, Graduate and Continuing Studies Admission, Rider University, New Jersey http://www.rider.edu/hr

Dean of Adult Education, Prairie State College, Illinois http://prairiestate.edu/

Assistant Provost for Online and Distance Learning Programs and Dean of the College of Continuing Education, Texas Southern University, Texas https://jobs.tsu.edu/

Director of Adult Degree Evening Program, California Lutheran University, Califormia  http://www.callutheran.edu/

Dean of Distance and Extended Learning, Indiana State University, Indiana http://www.indstate.edu/humres/

Director of Continuing Education, Galveston College, Texas http://www.gc.edu/

Regional Director, Southern Wesleyan University, South Carolina http://www.swu.edu/hr/faculty_application.htm

Assistant Dean, Continuing Education I, Dallas County Community College District, Texas https://www1.dcccd.edu/hr/jobs/application/jobapp.cfm?PosNum=081001009&PosTitle=Assistant+Dean%2c+Continuing+Education+I

Director of Adult Education - Corsicana Campus, Navarro College, Texas http://www.navarrocollege.edu/hr.php?id=3

Usually a story about distance learning

in Iraq means the student is stationed there.

Teaching Online From 'Mortaritaville' in Iraq - Distance Education - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Another reason to just say no


To a Ph.D.

On Hiring - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Replace iPod

With iPhone.


funny graphs and charts
see more Funny Graphs

She fought the law


And the law lost.  This nurse was able to deduct her MBA tuition even though the degree wasn't directly related to her occupation.  This might open things up for adult students pursuing professional degrees.  For example, I have a computer science professor buddy who is currently attending law school...

Nurse Outduels IRS on M.B.A. Tuition

Augmented Reality in Higher Ed

Augmented Reality in Higher Ed

Posted using ShareThis

Friday, January 15, 2010

For all my male continuing educator friends

Who drive chick cars.  Like VW Bugs.  And drink mai tais. Or worse.  Let's do better at the conference in Albuquerque...

11 Manliest Alcoholic Drinks Ever

Call for proposals

2010 ACHE Annual Conference and Meeting
Hotel Albuquerque
Albuquerque, New Mexico
October 20-23, 2010.

Continuing Education - Reflecting Upon and Responding to the National Agenda


To download the Call for Proposals Form, visit http://www.acheinc.org/ache2010/call_for_proposals.pdf.

You can view additional information about the conference at the 2010 ACHE Conference and Meeting http://www.acheinc.org/annual_conference.html.

The deadline for the Call for Proposals is Monday, February 1, 2010.

Please email your proposal to:

Dr. Jeffery Alejandro
Coordinator, Continuing Professional Education
Division of Continuing Studies
East Carolina University
301F Self-Help Center
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone (252) 328-9197
Fax (252) 328-9342
Email alejandroj@ecu.edu
Web http://www.cpe.ecu.edu/

Lumina's three ideas


For a National Strategy to Rapidly Train Workers for New Economy Jobs.  These three recommendations undergird many--perhaps most--adult degree program.  Especially number three.  Recognizing the college-level learning that an adult brings to a degree program is a strong motivator for completion.

Idea #1: Accelerated Associate Degrees


A major part of the national strategy for putting Americans back to work in living wage jobs must be to get more individuals into and through postsecondary education programs very rapidly, especially those offering degrees and credentials linked to high-demand, high-wage occupations. Two overarching factors make this an imperative. The first, already noted, is that the vast majority of jobs currently available—and those likely to be created in the near-term—require some form of postsecondary education. But the second factor is equally important—individuals and families without jobs or with limited income require immediate relief; something that has been difficult for college and university programs to provide. Many programs take too long to finish, particularly for families already under financial pressure. Time is a major factor that drives many individuals—both adults and traditional age students—into low-wage, low-skill jobs that simply intensify the need for additional, and often costly, education in the future.
Fortunately, there is a solution to this problem. Accelerated associate degree programs that allow students to achieve job-relevant postsecondary degrees and credentials in a year or less are being tested by states and institutions with the goal of helping students earn quality credentials that have real value in the new economy.
Idea #2: Seamless and Transparent Credentials

The second idea is even bigger, and would take longer to implement, but would affect every aspect of postsecondary education and workforce development. It is also, we believe, essential to creating an education and training system sufficient to meet the needs of a knowledge-based economy. This idea is to create a seamless postsecondary credentials system—one in which all education beyond high school is recognized, counted, and integrated to support skills upgrading, degree ladders, and lifelong learning for all.

Idea #3: Credit for Prior Learning


Prior learning assessment (PLA) is a strategy for helping adults enter or re-enter higher education, reduce the costly and frustrating need to "relearn" skills and knowledge already gained, and complete degrees and credentials more quickly. Recent research shows that students who receive credit for prior learning have better academic achievement, including greater persistence and higher graduation rates. Such students also save valuable time and money.
Three Ideas

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Memphis upset

with its absence in the new higher education legislation.  Isn't it too late to send ideas once it is passed?  And it's on the fast track.

Don't Just Complain

Gov. Phil Bredesen said Wednesday that his Memphis critics need to "relax," quit complaining and "bring me some ideas" about how to improve the research capabilities of the University of Memphis, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and other local institutions.

But the governor made it clear that while the state's "first priority as a research university has got to be UT Knoxville," Memphis has "real possibilities" as well. He added that exactly what that should be has yet to gel into a real plan.

Bredesen's remarks came in response to criticism from Memphis business leaders over the omission of any reference to the UofM or UTHSC in a higher education reform bill that he asked a special session of the legislature to approve Monday.
In addition to restructuring public higher education funding and the community college system, the bill bolsters UT Knoxville's research efforts in energy, science, technology, engineering and mathematics, largely by increasing its ties to the nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Memphis leaders made it clear that they didn't begrudge the Knoxville improvements but were disappointed by the complete absence of the UofM from the bill despite years of talks with Bredesen about raising the school's research profile and research ties to other local institutions.

Using community colleges as a portal


on the path to improve graduation rates.  I understand the thinking.  If the universities raise admission standards and increase retention efforts, their graduation rates would go up.  Better students equals better graduation rates.  However, this could not help community college graduation rates, which are bad.  And to do a better job with these students, community colleges would need more money.  Where is that coming from?  This is from the tennessean.com.

Bredeson Outlines Plans to Raise College Graduation Rates
Tennessee ranks 42nd in the nation in both population of college graduates and college graduation rate. Graduation rates around the state range from 58 percent at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville to 27 percent at Austin Peay State University.


The reasons why range from the state's large population of first-generation college students to a higher education system that makes it hard for students to transfer credits from one institution to another.

Among other things, Bredesen has proposed funneling many students through community colleges before they move on to complete their degrees at universities — a move he hopes would cut down on the need for remedial classes at four-year schools and on the number of students who get so frustrated with classes that they just drop out.

The plan outlined by the governor and approved by the state higher education commission Wednesday would also reward state universities and community colleges not just for the number of students they enroll, but the number they graduate in a timely fashion — six years for universities, three for colleges offering associate degrees.

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Tennessee governor

Addresses the General Assembly.  He wants to change the state's funding formula to reward retention and degree completion instead of enrollment.  His example is powerful, although it assumes that all Tennessee high school graduates attend a college or university in the state.  Still, it shows our degree attainment in Tennessee is craptastic.

Bredesen urges swift passage of education innovation plan

Over the years, we have talked a great deal about graduation rates and degree rates and rankings and so on. Perhaps the best way to look at Tennessee's challenges, and our opportunities, in public education is to look at our education pipeline.
More specifically, look at those children who enter our public high schools. How they progress. And what happens to them when they leave.

Putting it in plain English: For every 100 students who enter ninth grade in our public schools, 67 graduate from high school in four years. Of those, 43 go directly to college after graduation. Of those, 29 return for their sophomore year of college. And finally, just 19 graduate with an associate's degree in three years or a bachelor's degree in six years.

Let me recap. For every 100 ninth graders, we ultimately produce just 19 Tennesseans who hold a two-year or four-year degree.

We can do better. We've got to do better.

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Call for proposals

Theresa Neil Fund


The Summer Session Research Consortium, which consists of the North American Association of Summer Sessions (NAASS); the North Central Conference on Summer Schools (NCCSS); the Western Association of Summer Session Administrators (WASSA); and the Association of University Summer Sessions (AUSS) is pleased to announce a Call for Proposals for the Theresa Neil Memorial Research Fund.

Amount of Award: The total available for fiscal year 2010-2011 is $9,000. One or two proposals will be supported from this amount.

Research Topics: The Consortium invites proposals that address pedagogical or administrative issues that pertain to summer session at North American colleges and universities. For example:

• Analysis of summer faculty salary issues

• Assessment of student needs

• Effects of administrative reorganization (e.g. centralization/decentralization or change from state            support to self support)

• Factors related to student choice to attend summer (e.g. at what point in time is the decision to attend made and why?)

• The impact of technology on summer sessions (e.g. new models for distance delivery of courses)

• Learning outcomes of compressed or time-intensive courses vs. full semester-length counterparts

• Relationship of economic factors (unemployment, for example) to summer enrollment

• The effectiveness of particular marketing strategies

For full details on the Theresa Neil Award, please visit: NAASS.ORG
Deadline. Proposals must be postmarked or submitted electronically to the Research Consortium Chair, Dr. Carol Drake at carol.drake@colorado.edu by FEBRUARY 19, 2010.

Monday, January 11, 2010

17th annual

Adult Learning in Tennessee Conference
Connecting Adult Learners to Your Campus
February 18-19, 2010
Middle Tennessee State University
Murfreesboro, TN

Dr. Kristen Betts is the keynote speaker.  Dr. Betts plans to highlight the factors driving adult learning enrollments and to present a way for personalizing technology-supported programming. She will also share successful strategies to increase adult learner engagement and retention through innovative student services interactive programs such as virtual tea, alumni lecture series, CEO Leadership Workshop series, and other initiatives.

Students Are Encouraged to Attend the Conference

Conference Registration

Registration deadline is February 5, 2010 to confirm food and other arrangements and to be able to send you the detailed schedule, directions, and parking instructions. Participants who send registration forms arriving after that date may not receive this information in time.

Hotel Accommodations

The Doubletree Hotel is the conference hotel. The hotel deadline is January 29, 2010. Call them directly to make your reservations.  Single rooms are $70.00; doubles are $90.00, plus tax. Make your reservations by January 29, 2010, to guarantee the conference rate. Call 615-895-5555 to make your reservations. Be sure to tell them you are with the Adult Learning Conference at MTSU to receive the special conference rate.

For more information, visit the conference website at Connecting Adult Learners to Your Campus

Call for nominations




Dear ACHE members:


The ACHE Nominations Committee is currently accepting nominations for:

     • Directors-at-Large (two openings) and

     • Vice President.

The Association will present its slate of candidates in the March Five Minutes with ACHE. In order to submit a nomination, an online form is available at:  http://tinyurl.com/ache-2010-nominations

Individuals may self-nominate or be nominated by a colleague. Once nominations are received, the chair of the Nominations Committee, Rick Osborn, will contact nominees with requests for additional information.

Please direct any inquiries to the Nominations Committee Chair:

Rick Osborn
Immediate Past President, ACHE
Dean, School of Continuing Studies & Academic Outreach
East Tennessee State University
OSBORNR@mail.etsu.edu
(423) 439-8300
(423) 773-3452 (cell)

ALL NOMINATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY MARCH 1, 2010.

Participation as a Director-at-Large or as Vice President constitutes a significant opportunity to serve ACHE and continuing higher education. Nominees for Vice President must have served at least two years as a Director-at-Large. For a description of the roles and responsibilities of ACHE Officers, please consult the ACHE Guide for Officers and Board Members. (http://tinyurl.com/acheguide-officers-board)

We hope that you will consider nominating a colleague this year!

Thursday, January 7, 2010

Note from a continuing educator

Got this today and thought I'd share.

Fact of Life:
After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says W T F?...

UCEA 2010

Marketing Seminar.
February 10-12
Tampa, Florida

Featured keynotes include:

Marketing at the Digital Edge, Katie McGlynn, AdWords, Online Sales & Operations, Google Education

A New Generation of Learning: Leveraging Emerging Technologies, Reaching Diverse Students, and Planning for the Road Ahead, Mark David Milliron, Ph.D., President and CEO, Catalyze Learning

Understanding Strategies, Tactics and Measurement, Paul Welty, Ph.D., CEO & Chief Strategist, Synaxis

Strategies for adapting and excelling in this new marketing arena are in much demand. Hear how your colleagues have developed and implemented successful plans that have bridged the marketing gap and linked the ever-changing real and virtual worlds at the 2010 UCEA Marketing Seminar .

To learn more about these sessions and our concurrent sessions, download the conference brochure or visit the conference Web site.

I have one of these

Annoying habits.  But at least I add an "O" to it.  I thought some response was better than no response...

Are You the Annoying Coworker?
Annoying habit No. 1: You give more advice than a newspaper columnist.
Annoying habit No. 2: You can't let go of the good ol' days.
Annoying habit No. 3: It's not HBO. It's an office.
Annoying habit No. 4: You always rely on the kindness of strangers -- and co-workers and administrative assistants and the mail clerk.
Annoying habit No. 5: You have an even better story. You always have a better story.
Annoying habit No. 6: You smell like a walking bag of potpourri.
Annoying habit No. 7: The subject line of an e-mail is the entire message.
Annoying habit No. 8: "K"*
Annoying habit No. 9: You can't wait until the day is over. Every day.
Annoying habit No. 10: You heard someone got a really good parking space, so you decide to throw a party.
*Why it's annoying: If your entire response to someone's e-mail is "k," then you probably didn't need to respond at all. And you definitely didn't need to copy everyone on it. You should have at least taken the time to type a few extra letters so it reads "Thanks for letting me know." People are taking the time to read your message, so make it worth their while.

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

State of the year

Tennessee Named 2009 State of the Year by Magazine

Tennessee was named the 2009 State of the Year by Business Facilities magazine, a national economic development publication.

Business Facilities' Editor in Chief Jack Rogers said Bredesen and his team impressed the magazine with their strategy put in place for a solid foundation in Tennessee for future growth for years to come. The magazine also recognized the state's committment to the creation of clean energy jobs.

Tennessee has recently won other awards recognizing its growth. It was ranked among the top five U.S. states for best business climates by Site Selection magazine. Southern Business & Development magazine named Tennessee co-state of the year and Bredesen, Commissioner Matt Kisber of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development and Revenue Commissioner Reagan Farr were named to the publication's to the Ten People Who Made A Difference list. In addition, Area Development magazine gave Tennessee its Gold Shovel Award, given to the state achieving the most success in terms of job creation and economic impact.

EduComm 2010

June 7-9
The Mirage, Las Vegas

Join higher education leaders at the world-class Mirage in Las Vegas for three days of stimulating intellectual debate on how emerging technologies are transforming today's—and tomorrow's—college campus.

EduComm 2010 agenda will bring together top thought leaders, innovators, and speakers to present, discuss, and navigate the unprecedented challenges and opportunities shaping the future of higher education, and to identify solutions for unprecedented success.

EduComm 2010 registration opens on January 20, 2010. Mark your calendar for June 7-9, 2010, and plan now to join us at EduComm 2010 at the Mirage in Las Vegas!

Submit speaking proposals for EduComm 2010 at www.educomminstitute.com/speakers

For sponsorship or exhibitor opportunities, contact Matt Kinnaman mkinnaman@universitybusiness.com

Tennessee governor stumping

for education reform.  For K-12, he wants to use student achievement as a basis for tenure and evaluation of teachers.  For higher education, he wants the following:

  • Alter the formula for education funding of public colleges and universities to place more emphasis on student retention and graduation and less on simple enrollment levels.
  • Create more uniform community college courses and transfer standards so more students will use the colleges for their first two years and either obtain associates degrees there or move on to four-year schools for baccalaureate degrees.
  • Place the community colleges in a single system within the State Board of Regents.
Bredesen Urges Business Leaders

Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Addressing the part-time dilemma

At community colleges.  In Tennessee, we're trying to expand the role of community colleges.  It's going to be difficult because of resources and issues like part timeness.  Two-thirds of the faculty are part-time, teaching up to half of the students.

Connecting with Part-Timers

The "part timeness" of students and faculty members is one of the greatest challenges community colleges face in creating strong campus connections, according to this year's Community College Survey of Student Engagement.

Students who enroll part time are less engaged than their full-time peers, and more likely to drop out of college. That likelihood is high at community colleges, where close to two-thirds of students attend part time.

Meanwhile, many instructors at community colleges do not work full time on one campus. Sixty-seven percent of faculty members teach part time, yet typically teach half to two-thirds of all course sections, according to the survey.

"They play a large role in shaping students' experience, yet in far too many colleges they are minimally involved with students beyond the hours they are teaching," says Kay M. McClenney, director of the Center for Community College Student Engagement.

To engage part-time students, the survey suggests, colleges must make the most of the minimal time they spend on campuses. Colleges can provide support services at times convenient to part-time students or integrate services into required course work. They can also link study-skills courses with developmental courses so that part-time students who need remediation will be more likely to succeed.
In order to close the connection gap, colleges must find ways to offer part-time faculty members the same kinds of instructional support and professional development that are available to their full-time colleagues, the survey recommends.

Monday, January 4, 2010

College courses

Taught without faculty.  Or in another, more accurate way, by using faculty more effectively by teaming them with technology.

Hybrid Education 202

Redefining



how we measure academic progress? Maintaining standards in a time of accelerated programs and fluid definitions of hours...

Thinking Beyond the Credit Hour

In the era of distance education and a growing movement toward the "unbundling" of higher education to allow for study outside traditional classroom formats, has the "credit hour" become a relic?
The credit hour "is the coin of the realm, but it's badly in need of an update," argues Robert W. Mendenhall, president of Western Governors University, the 10-year-old nonprofit institution known for its competency-based system for awarding degrees. "It's time we measured learning rather than time."

Mr. Mendenhall says many of the discussions about higher-education financing, quality, and accountability could be more productive "if we could redefine credit hour as a 'chunk of learning.'" After all, he notes, the issue for governments is whether they are getting their money's worth. "Ultimately they want to pay for learning, not for time. I don't know if they know that yet."

Higher Ed Morning's

The Top 10 Stories of 2009

  1. The top 5 ways students use technology to cheat
  2. Top 8 ways students are cheating today
  3. The hidden problem with Twitter
  4. Which schools are the best places to work?
  5. Parents blame school for drunk student’s fatal fall
  6. New grad can’t find job so sues college
  7. Study: How Twitter is hurting students
  8. Paying girls not to get pregnant
  9. School club supports abortion now it’s gone
  10. America’s most dangerous campuses

 

Sunday, January 3, 2010

Call for proposals

ACHE South Regional Conference in San Antonio.

ACHE South is seeking proposals for concurrent sessions for the 2011 conference, April 17 - 20, 2011. This year’s theme is Viva Fiesta: A Celebration of Lifelong Learning. Information about conference tracks and proposal guidelines can be found on the conference website.

Send proposals via email by January 14, 2011 as a Microsoft Word attachment to: Amy Johnson, East Tennessee State University, at johnsoad@etsu.edu.