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Showing posts from December, 2013

Info-Christmas breaking

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Explore more infographics like this one on the web's largest information design community - Graphs.net.

Info-Christmas breaking

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Explore more infographics like this one on the web's largest information design community - Graphs.net.

Info-Christmas breaking

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[Source: Today I found out]

Info-Christmas breaking

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by jamesepiphany.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web's largest information design community - Visually.


Info-Christmas breaking

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Info-Christmas breaking

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An infographic by the team at Audionetwork

Merry Christmas

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[Source: Today I Found Out]

Merry Christmas

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[Source: Today I found out]

Info-Christmas breaking

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by JessicaDraws.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web's largest information design community - Visually.

Info-Christmas breaking

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Infographic Friday

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[Source Reflect Digital]

Save the date

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October 27-29, 2014
Tropicana Las Vegas Casino Hotel Resort
Las Vegas, NV

Info-Christmas breaking

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Embedded from BestInfographics.co

Info-Christmas breaking

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by WpromoteInc.
Explore more infographics like this one on the web's largest information design community - Visually.

Social notworking

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OMG.  An English teach finds some positives from social networking.  By Andrew Simmons, writing in The Atlantic.
Facebook Has Transformed My Students' Writing—for the Better However, while Facebook and Twitter have eroded writing conventions among my students, they have not killed the most important ingredients in personal writing: self-reflection and emotional honesty. For younger high school boys particularly, social networking has actually improved writing – not the product or the process, but the sensitivity and inward focus required to even begin to produce a draft that will eventually be worth editing.   High school is cruel to all genders, an equal-opportunity destroyer of spirit and self-esteem. I'm focusing on boys because I've seen the phenomenon play out more intensely with them. Also, I was a boy once, and so I understand them better than I understand girls.   When I was beginning high school in 1994 boys knew not to reveal weakness and insecurity. Girls didn&#…

This is the story continuing educators have heard for 30 years

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I suppose as long as it makes news, we have some measure of job security.  Maybe not a lot, but some.  From Michele Willens, writing in The Atlantic.
What It's Like to Be a Middle-Aged College Student I am clearly not alone in my quest for academic validation: Well over half a million of the students enrolled in degree-granting institutions are over the age of 50. “One advantage about returning to college later in life is that the student will likely have a greater sense of purpose and focus and thus be able to capitalize better on what is offered,” says Margaret Gatz, a psychology professor at University of Southern California. “Another advantage is that the older student brings a lifetime of experiences and knowledge to the new information being presented and thus can have a richer learning experience.”  Gatz points out potential barriers, including competing demands. (Every time I tell my adviser that I can’t imagine how students could be taking four, even five classes at a tim…

Infographic Friday

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Enrollments and revenue predicted to decline

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At a growing number of colleges and universities.  Particularly at risk are regional publics and small privates.  But hasn't that always been the case?  From CBS News Moneywatch.
Rocky financial times for U.S. universities A new report by Moody’s Investors Service highlights the growing dysfunction among U.S. universities, with revenue falling at many schools even as tuition costs continuing to climb.   The credit rating agency estimates that net revenue is expected to decline at 28 percent of public universities in fiscal year 2104 and at 19 percent of private institutions. Moody’s also expects net tuition revenue to grow in 2014 at less than inflation for 44 percent of public universities and 42 percent of private ones.  “Public universities have not experienced such poor prospects for tuition revenue growth in more than two decades,” the report concluded.  As financial support from states has declined, meanwhile, students are expected to cover more of their education costs. In …

I may have mentioned earlier that I was an English major...

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I find it hard to believe

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That we're less courteous than, say, Illinois. Have they ever been to Chicago? From The Atlantic.
Congratulations, Ohio! You Are the Sweariest State in the Union Marchex also attempted to measure more general indications of courtesy—using "please" and "thank you," that kind of thing. And you know who came in for another shout-out? Hello again, Ohio. The other least-courteous states, in order: Wisconsin, which took first place, Massachusetts, Indiana, and Tennessee.And the most courteous? South Carolina (first place!), North Carolina, Maryland, Louisiana, and Georgia.

Rethinking developmental studies

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We're no longer just throwing remedial courses at students who need help. Of course, this is not just a community college problem.  We call our program learning support.  From Sophie Quinton, writing in The Atlantic.
Algebra Doesn't Have to Be Scary
Arica Hawley used to dread math class. She would look at problems and not even know where to begin. When Hawley, 37, went back to Tacoma Community College last fall to finish her associate's degree, she placed into a pre-algebra course—eighth-grade-level material.  Her mindset didn't change until she took Statway, a college-level statistics course for students who need to master high-school algebra. She earned a math credit, and gained the confidence she needed to switch to a math- and science-heavy nursing program.

Many community-college students never make it to graduation because they can't pass developmental, or remedial, math. Two courses from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and its partners …

Infographic Friday

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Explore more infographics like this one on the web's largest information design community - Visually.


I got this telegram from a Nigerian prince...

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Con artists have always been around.  From The Atlantic.
Victorian Trolling: How Con Artists Spammed in a Time Before Email As Whitaker notes, schemes like this strike us as modern inventions, the provenance of Nigerian email scammers and shady characters on Craigslist trying to get you to wire them money.  Yet the human desire for lucre—and the unscrupulousness methods we often employ in its pursuit—knows few limitations, geographic or historic. As Whitaker describes, the main difference between our 21st-century cons and those of the Victorian period is one of delivery method.  Whitaker has uncovered documents from 1905 supposedly written by a distressed Spaniard named Luis Ramos and Jean Richard, a prison chaplain. Addressed to a London shopkeeper named Paul Webb, these letters are straight out of the email scam playbook: Ramos claims to have “property valuable to £37.000” deposited “in a sure English Bank,” and he’ll give Webb a cut if the Englishman agrees to send Ramos a small amo…

The jerk store called

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And it's not always a bad thing.  From Time.
3 Ways Being a Jerk at Work Pays Off You don’t want a reputation as the office bully, but it turns out there are some attributes of narcissistic or Machiavellian personalities that could give your career a boost.   Social scientists aren’t just looking for a silver lining; they theorize that there must be some evolutionary benefit to being a jerk. The trouble is, those shrewd or sneaky behaviors that kept our caveman ancestors alive don’t translate as well to the 21st-century water cooler.  But there are things we can learn from the blowhards, braggarts and backstabbers we have to deal with, and there are even a few behaviors that, when decoupled from the rest of a toxic personality, can give you a leg up on the job.

I guess I'm a slacker

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I don't check my smartphone until after I've had some coffee.  Unless I'm using it for an alarm.  From Time.
Survey: Almost All Smartphone Owners Do the Same Thing When They Wake Up What’s the first thing you do when you wake up in the morning? Brush your teeth? Take a shower?  According to mobile testing firm SOASTA, it’s none of these. A new 10-city survey of the mobile phone habits of smartphone owners has revealed that 84% of us check an app first thing in the morning.  The study shows that New Yorkers are especially tech addicted – 92% of city residents start their day by firing up a smartphone. Los Angeles found itself at the bottom of the list, with only 75% of smartphone owners checking an app first thing.

Why do we drive on a parkway and park on a driveway? Gotta love English...

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[Infographic provided by Grammar.net]