Thursday, October 30, 2014

Don't retire in the north

But I supposed everybody already knows that.  From Mainstreet.com.

The Best and Worst States to Retire
The top cities to retire include:

1. Tampa, Fla.

2. Grand Prairie, Texas

3. Orlando, Fla.

4. St. Petersburg, Fla.

5. Scottsdale, Ariz.

 These cities had ample job opportunities for those over age 65 and are also in states with some of the lowest tax rates in the country.  
“People work in the northeast for their professional careers, but tend to downsize and move south for retirement,” Bernardo adds.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

More bad news for English majors?

Maybe.  But many of these students may have entered community colleges thinking they would transfer to a university, so they pursued the general studies track--the most common one used for transfer.  Then they didn't transfer and find themselves with an associate degree comprised of general education courses.  It's much harder to follow that to employment. From The Hechinger Report.

Some degrees produce no bump in earnings, research finds
New research unveiled here has exposed an exception to the higher-education mantra that people with degrees earn more than people without them. 
The research, conducted under the aegis of the Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment and focused on community colleges, confirms the widely accepted belief that many graduates make more than people without degrees. 
But it also found that the large proportion of community-college students who major in the liberal arts, humanities, and general studies and have not gone on to earn bachelor’s degrees receive little or no financial advantage at all in exchange for their time and tuition. Nor do recipients of many newly trendy professional certificates. 
Researchers speculated that students at community colleges may end up in the liberal arts because there’s not enough room in nursing or technical programs, or because they’re not aware of the earnings implications. 
There are limitations to the data. For example, it doesn’t track whether those humanities majors ultimately transfer to four-year universities and colleges and boost their income by earning bachelor’s degrees. And because of differences in the way higher education and earnings information is tracked, there are variations in the way the research was conducted in various states. 
In Florida, however, where researchers followed students from the eighth grade through the end of their educations, 55 percent of those who went to community colleges ended up in liberal-arts or general-studies programs, which also have among the lowest graduation rates and lowest earnings.
The results are likely to turbo-charge the ongoing debate about whether the purpose of a higher education is to impart knowledge or vocational skills.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A Pharmacy School Bubble

Ready to burst?  I know Pharmacy Schools have popped up like mushrooms all around ETSU. From The New Republic.

The Pharmacy School Bubble Is About to Burst: One of America's most reliable professions is producing too many graduates and not enough jobs
The pharmacy boom began in 2000. That year, a report from the Department of Health and Human Services suggested that 98 percent of Americans lived in an area adversely affected by a pharmacist shortage. Almost 6,000 pharmacist jobs stood empty, and the shortage was only predicted to grow worse. The following year, a group now known as the Pharmacy Workforce Center predicted a shortfall of 157,000 pharmacists nationally within two decades as demand and responsibilities increased while the number of pharmacists stood still. As Baby Boomers aged, the thought went, pharmacists would be able to fill some roles traditionally held by doctors, and would be able to counsel them on how to take the medications prescribed to them. 
Quickly, the free market kicked in. Over the last 20-odd years, the number of pharmacy schools in the United States has almost doubled. There were just 72 such schools in 1987; today, there are more than 130.  
At first, graduates found work easily. No matter where in the country a young pharmacist wanted to settle, the number of jobs available far exceeded the number of people qualified to fill them. Slowly, the numbers began to even out, and 2009 marked a turning point: The number of jobs available was roughly on par with the number of pharmacists searching for work. The days of signing bonuses and vast job choices were over. 
Purdue University, whose pharmacy school is ranked as one of the best in the nation, makes employment information about its graduates publicly available. By and large, the numbers are impressive—from salaries to unemployment statistics. But some statistics have changed. In 2008, graduates got up to eight offers; in 2009, up to 12. These days, the range is from one to three offers per graduate. In 2008, only one student was still seeking work when the university surveyed the graduating class; by 2012, that number had grown to eight students, and by 2013, to 12. (The average graduating class has about 150 students.)  
According to the Aggregate Demand Index (ADI), which measures pharmacist job outlooks, employers in the Northeast began reporting more job candidates than slots in December 2011. Quickly, everywhere from Hawaii to Utah became a tough market. Now, only about ten states have decent employment prospects, with enough openings for every job seeker. In the rest of the country, pharmacists are seeing either a surplus of candidates, or a rough balance of supply and demand. 

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Social notworking

Keith Ferrazzi, author of Never Eat Alone, discusses social networking on CBS Moneywatch. 

Good social media is sharing quality content and joining conversations. Bad use is marketing, bragging and forced manipulation. You will also want to leverage each platform with their strengths, Facebook has tremendous reach, but Twitter is instantaneous. LinkedIn (LNKD) is a business interested community. Make sure the content you create is good for the specific audience available. 
Your audience will determine if the content you put out is good or bad, and you can tell by their engagement. If the content is good, you will see engagement. If it is bad, they won't engage. You serve them, not the other way around.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Osborn's Law of Graduate School Debt

Osborn's Law of Graduate School Debt: Never borrow money for graduate school unless (a) you're seeking a degree in a professional field with excellent employment possibilities, (b) you already have a job and need the graduate degree for advancement, or (c) you need to fill the gaps (i.e. summer school enrollment) in your graduate assistantship, fellowship, or other supported position at your university.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Socks appeal

What can I say?  I like a fancy pair of socks.  Little did I know I was making a statement.  Just wait until they see my socks at ACHE!  From The Atlantic.

'Like Lingerie for Men': How Statement Socks Became So Trendy
The statement sock—whether distinguished by a bright hue or a bold pattern or both at the same time—has become the go-to fashion accessory for guys from Wall Street, where “Friday socks” is a thing, to Silicon Valley, where every day is Friday. (Startup guys, according to one Bay Area buyer, favor not just colorful socks but also socks decorated with “words like ‘bacon’ and ‘beer’” and also “anything with ninjas.”) 
All of which helps to explain new sales numbers released today by the retail analytics firm NPD, revealing a 2-percent growth in sock sales between August 2013 and August 2014. That's a rate that has, in a weak economy, outpaced the general growth of the $206.7 billion global apparel market. And NPD speculates that it has been men, in particular, who have driven the increase. As Marshal Cohen, NPD’s chief industry analyst, explains it: “Over the past year, socks have become yet another outlet for expressing the extra splash of pattern and color they seek.”

* * *

The appeal of the statement sock—a more masculine answer to the statement jewelry that has long added versatility to women’s wardrobes—has contributed to a counterintuitive phenomenon: Last year, for the first time in more than a decade, the sales of men's apparel outpaced those for women. Driving the growth, according to the Wall Street Journal? “Double-digit gains in outerwear, pants, and socks.”

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Always connected. Always.

My advice is take your vacation. And gather ye rosebuds while ye may.  Mary Elizabeth Williams, writing in Salon, warns us about the pre-cation: paid time off before you start.

The “pre-cation” is a trap!
As Oremus points out, we are already a vastly overworked nation. We put in considerably more hours than we did a generation ago —  and most of us are doing it while facing what the New York Times last year called “flatlined” wages. A new study released last month revealed that Americans take only about half the vacation time they’re entitled to, missing out on the equivalent of “over 500 million” days off a year. Why? Because they’re afraid of repercussions, an anxiety reinforced by what MarketWatch notes is “company culture and lack of encouragement from management to take time off.” People are reluctant to take vacations for fear they’ll be revealed as expendable. It actually happened to me at an old job – I came back from a week away and was promptly told, the day I returned, they were “restructuring the department” and I was no longer needed. We’re likewise afraid to take time off for legitimate medical reasons, hiding even serious illnesses for fear of being dinged for “absenteeism.” 
I entered the workforce in the last era of coming in to a place, doing the work and leaving at the end of the day, in no small part because most people still didn’t have cellphones. I still recall the precise moment I realized we were all screwed. It was when AT&T rolled out its benevolently futuristic ad campaign twenty years ago. In it, the voice of Tom Selleck promised a tomorrow full of many wonderful things that in fact have come to pass. “Have you ever borrowed a book from thousands of miles away? Crossed the country without stopping for directions? Have you ever watched the movie you wanted to, the minute you wanted to?” 
But the chiller for me was when he asked if you’d ever “sent a fax from the beach?” and then ominously vowed, “You will.” Okay, so nobody knows what a fax is any more. The implication was clear. You will always be reachable. You will always be findable. Whatever your pristine sanctuary of retreat was, you will now be able to, ergo expected to, work from it. At the time, I was living in San Francisco, and had several friends working at a new enterprise in the tech world. The company was instantly famous — right before this became pretty normal — for having a gorgeous kitchen, a game area where workers could play, a highly encouraged policy of letting them sleep over — and for not letting employees go out for lunch unless it was for client meetings. Why would you want to leave paradise? Also, you can’t.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

Less than two weeks away

This year's ACHE conference looks like the biggest in years.  You can still register Here.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Book your room today!

Join your fellow continuing educators at the 46th Annual Tennessee Alliance for Continuing Higher Education Annual Conference in Chattanooga from November 12-14.  With sessions on topics such as embedding continuing education training into credit courses, marketing your off-campus site, and an update on Tennessee Promise—to only name a few—there is sure to be information that will help you improve your job performance.  The conference brochure including a link to registration is available here.  And if you’re ready to register, go to ETSU’s Professional Development registration site, click on Academic Conferences, and then on TACHE Conference.  The cost is $185 for members and $205 for non-members.


Held at the fabulous Chattanoogan, the hotel is convenient to all the exciting things Chattanooga has to offer! Contact the hotel at the above link or call 1-800-619-0018 to make reservations.  Be sure to mention the TACHE group (#486565).

The conference rate of $119 is only available until October 13, so you need to act today!

Happy Columbus Day


Thursday, October 2, 2014

Join your fellow continuing educators at the 46th Annual Tennessee Alliance for Continuing Higher Education Annual Conference in Chattanooga from November 12-14.  With sessions on topics such as embedding continuing education training into credit courses, marketing your off-campus site, and an update on Tennessee Promise—to only name a few—there is sure to be information that will help you improve your job performance.  The conference brochure including a link to registration is available here.  And if you’re ready to register, go to ETSU’s Professional Development registration site, click on Academic Conferences, and then on TACHE Conference.  The cost is $185 for members and $205 for non-members.


Held at the fabulous Chattanoogan, the hotel is convenient to all the exciting things Chattanooga has to offer!  Contact the hotel at the above link or call 1-800-619-0018 to make reservations.  Be sure to mention the TACHE group (#486565). The conference rate of $119 is only available until October 13, so you need to act soon!

Let me Google it

When are we too dependent on technology?  Nick Romeo asks the question in The Atlantic.

Carr includes other case studies: He describes doctors who become so reliant on decision-assistance software that they overlook subtle signals from patients or dismiss improbable but accurate diagnoses. He interviews architects whose drawing skills decay as they transition to digital platforms. And he recounts frightening instances when commercial airline pilots fail to perform simple corrections in emergencies because they are so used to trusting the autopilot system. Carr is quick to acknowledge that these technologies often do enhance and assist human skills. But he makes a compelling case that our relationship with them is not as positive as we might think.
Something meant to expedite a task winds up being an indispensable technology. 
All of this has unmistakable implications for the use of technology in classrooms: When do technologies free students to think about more interesting and complex questions, and when do they erode the very cognitive capacities they are meant to enhance? The effect of ubiquitous spell check and AutoCorrect software is a revealing example. Psychologists studying the formation of memories have found that the act of generating a word in your mind strengthens your capacity to remember it. When a computer automatically corrects a spelling mistake or offers a drop-down menu of options, we’re no longer forced to generate the correct spelling in our minds.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Lewis's Law

I came across this term recently and just had to share. True, so true. From Wikipedia.

Lewis's Law
Lewis's law is an eponymous law taken from [Helen Lewis'] observation that "the comments on any article about feminism justify feminism". Lewis first made the observation on Twitter on 9 August 2012,[8] and it was quoted afterwards in Wired UK[9] as part of a piece on the Donglegate incident, in which an engineer and a developer evangelist were fired after the developer evangelist accused two engineers sitting behind her of making sexual jokes at PyCon 2013. Lewis has written frequently about misogynistic hate directed at women online.[10]