Posts

Showing posts from September, 2016

Infographic Friday

Image
Source: Parker + Lynch

Register now!

Image
The Tennessee Alliance for Continuing Higher Education (TACHE) 
CLICK HERE for the  Conference Agenda at a Glance
CLICK HERE to register NOW!

Not a TACHE member?Click here  and join TODAY!


East Tennessee State University's Office of Professional Development Box 70559 Johnson City, TN  37614-1707 423-439-8084 (local) 1-800-222-ETSU Email- goicl@etsu.edu Website -

U.S. Education Secretary John King visits

Image
Pellissippi State to learn about Tennessee Promise first hand. Leaves impressed, it appears. Across the state, though, Promise hasn't appeared to boost community college enrollments much. I was surprised. From The Atlantic.
Free College Is Not a Fantasy
Last year, President Obama visited this campus to unveil his proposal for tuition-free community college. The location was no accident. A couple of years ago, Tennessee launched the Tennessee Promise, which covers tuition and fees for two-year degrees and credentials for the state’s high-school graduates after Pell grants and a series of other funds and scholarships are exhausted. It is based on a Knoxville plan that had grown to include several other counties in the state. A bipartisan initiative supported by a Republican governor, the idea is to help fill a growing workforce need.  And it seems to be working. There had been concern that as more students who previously might not have considered college took advantage of the program…

Tennessee places two cities on this list

Image
Of America's ten most affordable cities. Nashville at seven and Memphis at ten. I'm a little surprised Nashville made the list. Louisville tops the list and Lexington comes in at four. From The Financial Word.
10 Most Affordable Cities In America
7) Nashville, TN Nashville is one of the more popular cities on this list. Arguably the best music city in the country, with stellar restaurants featuring an array of cuisines, Nashville has everything you want in a city.  The median household income is around $53,000, with a housing market that provides affordable rentals and housing prices with a median of about $172,000. While this ratio is a little high for this list, Nashville is still amazingly affordable. Tennessee is one of the few states that does not have an income tax, and aside from the tourist areas, most cost of living such as groceries, household items, gas and coffee are below the national average.  Nashville is one of those great places in the country where you can cele…

Most beautiful campus?

Image
Rhodes College comes out on top in The Princeton Review's list. Hmmm. Vanderbilt comes in at 11. From The Princeton Review.

Most Beautiful Campus
1. Rhodes College
Memphis, TN
2,046 Enrolled
From the School: Rhodes College is a national, residential liberal arts and sciences college located in historic Memphis, ...

Happy National Lobster Day!

Image
From Visually.

Infographic Friday

Image

Tennessee helping ITT Tech students

Image
After it closes its campuses in Nashville, Knoxville, Chattanooga, Cordova and Johnson City. Cordova? The Tennessee Higher Education Commission is trying to help ITT Tech students continue their postsecondary education. Since ITT Tech was not regionally accredited, its students will find it hard to transfer to more reputable institutions. It's more than a "bureaucratic complication." I hope their only option isn't another for-profit. From The Tennessean.
After ITT Tech closure, Tennessee rolls out student supports
During the closure process, the commission will be collecting transcripts for ITT students and building out an email distribution list to keep those students up to date as federal guidance continues to develop. Federal education officials have indicated that some ITT students might be eligible for student loan forgiveness, and Krause said the commission would link students with those resources when possible.  The commission also is working with state college…

We have over 400 staff affected

Image
By the new overtime rules. But I've been proud of how we've treated the folks moving from exempt to non-exempt. Those who find their status changed will continue to earn two vacation days; their replacements (and all other non-exempt hires after December 1) will earn one, like all other non-exempt employees. And we won't pay much overtime but will use comp time instead. What will really be interesting is the impact on admission counselors. If they have a distant college fair on a Monday morning and have to drive Sunday night--they're on the clock. But if there are several in the car, only the one driving is being paid. I think. From The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Colleges Brace for Impact of Overtime Rule Colleges are worried about how to cover the costs of overtime pay that dozens of coaches, counselors, and other employees may soon become entitled to under a new federal rule designed to ensure they're paid equitably.  The new law, a change to the Fair Labor St…

The South has cut public higher education much more

Image
Than the North. And Tennessee is one of the guilty parties. As others have noted, a few years ago, the state paid two-thirds of the cost of higher education and the student paid one-third. Now it's reversed. Now public institutions operate like they're private colleges with large state grants. From The Hechinger Report.
The new North-South divide: public higher education
Southern states have been disproportionately cutting spending on public higher education, forcing tuition increases that make their colleges and universities among the least affordable for the poorest families — who already face some of the nation’s highest poverty rates — a slew of recent data show.  This contributes to falling enrollment in states already struggling with some of the nation’s lowest percentages of residents with college educations.  It’s “a vicious circle,” said Dave Spence, president of the Atlanta-based Southern Regional Education Board, or SREB. “You’ve got a region that’s poor. Why? Becaus…

Megatronics is so hot right now

Image
And it was just a year or two ago I first heard the term. From The Chattanooga Free Press.
Georgia Northwestern Technical College opens new campus in Ringgold today For most people the word "mechatronics" may as well be something ripped out of a science-fiction novel in which robots have enslaved humanity. But for a handful of Catoosa County students, it's about to be their lives.  Georgia Northwestern Technical College is throwing open the doors to its new campus in Ringgold today, and included in the curriculum are several fields of study designed to equip the next generation of students.  The Ringgold school, one of six Georgia Northwestern Tech campuses in the region, will offer three new programs — mechatronics, cybersecurity and logistics — in addition to core and introductory college courses for the 130 students enrolled for the fall semester.  Leaders at the 60,000-square-foot facility say technical training is coming not a moment too soon, because the region has …

Happy Mayflower Day!

Image
From Visually.

Happy Mexican Independence Day!

Image
From Visually.

Some things you might not know about Dolly Parton

Image
Unless you have a season's pass to Dollywood like I do!Paste Monthly. From

A Life of Many Colors: Catching Up with Dolly Parton Paste: Another thing I really admire about your business ventures is the way they revolve around and work within Sevier County. What is it like to be connected to your hometown, and do you feel like you’re still able to be a part of the community?  Parton: It’s always great to feel like a hometown hero, and I take great pride in the fact that they’re proud of me. But they’re no more proud of me than I am of them, and of the Great Smokey Mountains in general. We’ve got the most visited national park in the United States! I just happened to be born up there in the foothills of the Great Smokies. I knew it was a good place to do business, so I thought very early on in my career that if I made it, I was going to invest and do some business things [in Sevier County, Tennessee]. I also wanted them to have things that would provide jobs for a lot of people there—…

TBR's Tristan Denley

Image
Named one of the sixteen most innovative people in higher education by Washington Monthly. I guess I need to apologize for being skeptical of the whole "mind-set" theory.
The Sixteen Most Innovative People in Higher Education
Tennessee has become a national leader in improving remediation (also known as developmental education—non-credit-bearing courses for students deemed academically not ready for college-level work), and Denley has had a lot to do with it. He was provost at Austin Peay State University when, in 2007, that school began to test the effectiveness of a co-requisite model: instead of making students complete multiple semesters of developmental math and writing before allowing them into college-level courses, a co-requisite model has students do remedial work in addition to, and at the same time as, credit-bearing classes. (Another pioneer of the approach is Peter Adams, formerly of the Community College of Baltimore County.) The experiment was wildly successful…

Happy Uncle Sam Day!

Image
Uncle Sam: The man and the meme The image of Uncle Sam as a personification of our nation and government is widespread and instantly recognizable. But did you ever wonder about where he came from? Was he purely imaginary, or based on a real historical figure?  The character Uncle Sam has a long history. The use of allegorical figures to represent a place dates back to the classical Roman era, and the Renaissance re-established them in Western art and culture by the 17th century. In the early days of the United States, a female figure named Columbia (the name is derived from Christopher Columbus) stood for the nation; she kept her place as an often-used symbol of our country through the early 20th century.  Uncle Sam has been around for almost as long, sometimes appearing with Columbia as well. There are several theories about where he comes from, but the most cited origin story traces Uncle Sam back to a man in Troy, New York. Sam Wilson delivered meat packed in barrels to soldiers dur…

Those zany millennials

Image
First they don't buy cars. Then they don't buy houses. And then they don't pay for music or television. But bars of soap? From CBS News.
Blame millennials for the vanishing bar of soap When it comes to how Americans use soap, it’s fair to say millennials are making a clean sweep of it.  Americans between 18 to 24 are largely snubbing the old-fashioned bar of soap, leading to sales declines for the likes of Ivory’s iconic 125-year old bar and its bar soap rivals, according to new data from consumer research firm Mintel. Consumers who still buy bar soap, it turns out, have something in common: they tend to be over 60 years old and are men.  It’s not as if Americans are less clean. Sales of soap, bath and shower products are on the rise, with overall market growth of 2.7 percent last year, Mintel found. Sales of bar soaps, though, slipped 2.2 percent from 2014 to 2015 as younger consumers and women snubbed the traditional bar in favor of liquid soap. So what’s driving the gene…

Infographic Friday

Image
Courtesy of: http://jetwriters.com

Today is International Literacy Day!

Image

Save the date

Image

And what time is it?

Image
Beer thirty. Perhaps I can make this my second career. From The Chronicle of Higher Education.
The Scholars Who Look at American History Through Beer-Tinted Glasses "I think people who aren’t historians," she says, "have a hard time imagining that beer can be the subject of serious historical inquiry."  That might be changing. The Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, last week posted a job ad seeking a scholar who can help the National Museum of American History collect artifacts and conduct field research for a project on beer brewing in the United States, with a focus on the last half-century. Three years ago, Oregon State University created the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives in a similar bid to preserve the historical record of beer making in that region.  Tiah Edmunson-Morton, curator of the Oregon archive, says that the idea of studying beer tends to draw amused grins from people who assume that the work is something like a never-ending happy hour, when in…

Happy Labor Day!

Image
From Visually.

Infographic Friday

Image
Embedded from qSample Blog

Burnout is worse than ever?

Image
Maybe not so much. Like the poor, it's always been with us. From The Week.
The myth of modern burnout "I'm so tired."  We hear this complaint all the time. These days, it seems everyone is exhausted. Everyone is at the end of their rope. Everyone needs some time off.  Indeed, 53 percent of American workers report feeling burnt out. It's easy to blame this on modern work culture. After all, the average American clocks in a 47-hour workweek. Meanwhile, we're spending more and more time in front of our computer screens, to our own detriment: Recent research says emails cause emotional exhaustion. A 2014 study found that using a smartphone before bed made workers more tired and less productive the next day. And on top of all that, we've got a tumultuous political cycle to contend with. A new survey from the Pew Research Center found that 59 percent of Americans already feel fatigued by election coverage.  Exhaustion can feel like the by-product of a new and mo…