Posts

Showing posts from 2017

Infographic Friday

Image
From Visually.

I always did like Gallatin

Image
The nicest place in America, according to Readers Digest.

Nicest Place in America 2017 Winner: Gallatin, Tennessee!
Gallatin is our winner for Nicest Places in America 2017. Aside from winning our online popular vote, Gallatin separated itself from the pack among our judges, who felt that the town’s story of racial reconciliation and grace through hardship really showed what “nice” is made of. It’s easy to be “nice” when things are going well. It’s much harder when folks face challenges. (Read more about Gallatin and why it’s the Nicest Place in America in 2017.)

Sadly,

Image
None of the happiest cities in the country can be found in Tennessee. Sigh. From The National Geographic.
These Are the Happiest Cities in the United States
Who are the happiest Americans? Ask this question anywhere from Montauk to Maui and you’re bound to pique interest (you may even pick a fight). While fans of the film Moana might sing the lyrics “Happiness is where you are,” for scientists studying the roots and fruits of happiness, location-specific qualities of place, community, and opportunity powerfully inform the way we feel about our lives.  National Geographic, bestselling author Dan Buettner, and Gallup’s social scientists teamed up to develop an index that assesses measurable expressions of happiness and identifies where Americans are living their best lives. Designed by Gallup senior scientist Dan Witters, the study established 15 metrics—from eating healthy and learning something new every day to civic engagement, financial security, vacation time, and even dental checku…

Happy Hanakkah!

Image

Down by the lazy river

Image
My curiosity piqued by an article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, I googled my alma mater's lazy river. Sure enough. Had it been around during my time at Iowa, I would have been too busy to use it much. But maybe I could have taken the kids.

The Lure of the Lazy River
Lazy rivers, while still relatively rare in higher education, are becoming a staple at public universities known for big-time college sports and vibrant social scenes. You’ll find them at the Universities of Alabama, Iowa, and Missouri and at Texas Tech. The University of Central Florida has plans to build a lazy river just for athletes, as part of a "Recovery Cove" that will also include miniature golf and beach-volleyball courts.

Infographic Friday

Image

Threats to public research universities

Image
Like my alma mater, The University of Iowa. From The Atlantic.
The Decline of the Midwest's Public Universities Threatens to Wreck Its Most Vibrant Economies But university research is in trouble, and so is an economy more dependent on it than many people understand. Federal funding for basic research—more than half of it conducted on university campuses like this one—has effectively declined since 2008, failing to keep pace with inflation. This is before taking into account Trump administration proposals to slash the National Science Foundation (NSF) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) budgets by billions of dollars more.  Trump’s cuts would affect all research universities, but not equally. The problem is more pronounced at public universities than private ones, and especially at public institutions in the Midwest, which have historically conducted some of the nation’s most important research. These schools are desperately needed to diversify economies that rely disproportion…

A useful word from the Urban Dictionary

Disastrophe A combination of the words 'disaster' and 'catastrophe' indicating a very serious and very tragic event. A tragedy of epic proportions.
The flood was a disastrophe for that region of the United States.

Creating the narrative

Image
When the narrative is you. I always said my English major helped me tremendously in both graduate school and in my career. Writing abstracts was a snap. I could write a persuasive essay/email/justification/budget request. Constant email usage has deteriorated my skills somewhat, especially proofreading skills, but my writing is still a powerful tool. From the Pacific Standard.

STUDYING HUMANITIES TEACHES YOU HOW TO GET A JOB
"If you're studying interpretive dance, God bless you, but there's not a lot of jobs right now in America looking for people with that as a skill set," Kentucky governor Matt Bevin declared in September, at a conference about higher education. Bevin's skepticism about the humanities and arts isn't an anomaly; politicians regularly joke about the supposed uselessness of non-STEM training. In 2014, President Barack Obama told students to major in trades rather than art history. In 2011, Governor Rick Scott of Florida said that it wasn't …

Activate the caregiving algorithm

Image
Slate magazine on automation and future occupations.I, for one, welcome our new robot overlords....
The Last Human Job
What abilities will set humans apart from machines?  It’s been a question at the center of decades of science fiction, and one that’s taken on increasing real-world urgency as we try to anticipate how the advancing artificial intelligence revolution will transform the way we work and live.  An emerging consensus suggests that two characteristics make humans distinct from machines: care and empathy. Machines may trounce humans at repetitive, predictable, and production-heavy jobs. But technology still falls behind with tasks that require context, nuance, constant adaptation, and emotional intelligence.  Because of this, research organizations—including the University of Oxford, McKinsey Global Institute, PwC, and the Shift Commission—predict that even though millions of jobs will likely be partially or fully automated in the coming decades, care-focused professions will…

Infographic Friday

Image
Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

Only of interest

Image
To an old English major like me. But I love this stuff! And this analysis of Mary Poppins holds together quite well. My only quibble is the title since the film is not really a retelling of the whole Bible, but a certain theme from the Bible. From Paste.
Mary Poppins Is a Retelling of the Bible
The movie title of John Lee Hancock’s Tom Hanks vehicle had it right: Mary Poppins is all about saving Mr. Banks. But from whom? Who is this mortal man, Banks (David Tomlinson), and why should he raise such a hubbub in 1910 London, capital of the world? Why should Mary Poppins be involved?  Simple: The 1964 movie Mary Poppins is a retelling of the Bible. It’s a tale of the cosmic struggle between God and the Devil. Call it the Book of Job reimagined, or Damn Yankees, or any of those old stories where Good and Evil cleverly duel for a single man’s soul.

Finish that dissertation!

Image
I always tell graduate students that they need to love their topic because it's going to dominate their lives for the next year. And if it doesn't dominate their lives, they will never finish. Here are eighteen more tips from Buzzfeed. My advice is paraphrased in the first tip.
18 Tips Every Student Should Know Before They Start Their Dissertation
1. Choose a topic you're truly interested in.  "Pick a topic/question that you are passionate about and have interest in. I completed my dissertation this year and I’m so glad I chose an interest of mine, I know people who lost interest after a few weeks."

What do Tennessee high school graduates

Image
Do after finishing high school? Thirty-nine percent don't attend postsecondary eduction. The Drive to 55 needs to lower that percentage. From The Tennessean.
Tennessee's newest report sheds light on student choices after high school
For Tennessee, of the state's 63,194 high school graduates in 2016, about a third went into four-year universities, a quarter enrolled in community college and about 3 percent went to a technical college, the report, compiled by the Tennessee Department of Education with data from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, shows.  The remainder of the graduates didn't enroll in any college — 39 percent.  And postsecondary enrollment rates differed across different groups of students relative to the state as a whole, the report shows.  Just over 50 percent of black, Hispanic, or Native American students and economically disadvantaged students progressed into postsecondary.  And for students with disabilities and English learners, just a third…

Happy National Electric Guitar Day!

Image
Find more great infographics on NerdGraph Infographics

No thanks, I had eels for lunch

Image
What, no tofurky? From TopTenz.

Top 10 Foods the Pilgrims Probably Ate at the First Thanksgiving
10. Eels It is well known that Squanto took pity on the Pilgrims, and helped teach them how to live off of the land and water. One of the hunting methods that Squanto taught them was to spear eels, who were curled up in muddy areas during colder weather. As a matter of fact, the feast made when the Pilgrims made peace with the leader of the Massosoit tribe was a feast of eels. The hunting of eels is also backed up by Pilgrim accounts. So yes, instead of cranberries, the first Thanksgiving would have probably featured a second helping of eel. Just like Grandma used to make.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Image
From Visually.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Image
Courtesy of: Bedding Stock

Happy Thanksgiving!

Image
by Ghergich.
From Visually.

With Thanksgiving around the corner, here's some info about last year's

Image
Source: WalletHub

Outsourcing dead

Image
In Tennessee higher education? Only Austin Peay State University bought into the Governor's plan. And only at UT Knoxville, were the projected saving substantial. 5.2 million dollars substantial, that is. From The Tennessean.
University of Tennessee board of trustees criticize Knoxville decision on outsourcing
The University of Tennessee board of trustees on Friday slammed a decision by Knoxville Chancellor Beverly Davenport to not participate in facilities outsourcing, even as Davenport argued the university wouldn't save as much by outsourcing as promised.   In a presentation to the board, Davenport said UT Knoxville would only save $906,654 in the first year of outsourcing with private company Jones Lang LaSalle, compared to the $5.2 million the company estimated.  The university is already making its own improvements in efficiency; an outside company would not be able to handle the complexity of work associated with facilities management in research departments and the chan…

Infographic Friday

Image
- See more at: http://ww2.ambitenergy.com/spark/colorful-fall-leaves-can-lead-to-bright-spring-flowers#sthash.mvi1x7Vd.dpuf

Betcha thought

Image
Vanderbilt would be on this list from Worldation.com.  But no. It turns out that few of these are in the South, and, of course, nearly no one pays full price. And the most expensive is...
The 31 most expensive colleges in AmericaHarvey Mudd College  Cost per year: $67,255. And here we have it, ladies and gentlemen – the most expensive college in America! Harvey Mudd College is situated in Claremont, California and is a state-of-the-art facility dedicated to courses such as mathematics, engineering, and science. Despite its hefty price tag and its full-on workload, the location of the college is beautiful and relaxing, and the perfect way to chill out after a hard day’s study. Just a shame we can’t afford it…

College advice from across the pond

Image
Some of these translate over here better than others. I've listed the top five below, and I don't even know what number four means. From BuzzFeed.
35 Things All Students Learn In Their First Week At Uni 1. Your name doesn’t matter anymore and you will only introduce yourself by saying what course you’re on and where you’re from.  2. The Domino's free freshers’ week pizza is your best friend.  3. You will learn that you can never specifically say where you live. You have to say how far you are from the nearest big city like“oh I’m from near Liverpool”.  4. Your accent is stronger than you think, and yes, people can take the mick out of it for three whole years.  5. But you will also have a hand in taking the mick out of everyone else’s accent.

Unsurprisingly, two towns from around here are on this list

Image
Gatlinburg and Asheville. I thought Boone or Blowing Rock might make the list, as well. Visit Blowing Rock and you step into a Norman Rockwell painting. From MSN.Com.

The 20 Best Mountain Towns in America
GATLINBURG, TENNESSEE A worthy stop on any road trip across the American South, Gatlinburg puts you face-to-face with Great Smoky Mountains National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. When you're not hitting the park trails, check out Ripley's Aquarium or the Hollywood Star Cars Museum, or head downtown. That bustling district, which is filled with mountain-themed specialty shops, lights up from November to February each year for the not-to-be-missed annual Winterfest Celebration. ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA  While the opulent Biltmore Estate is well worth the trip south of the city center to Biltmore Village, it's the breathtaking Blue Ridge Parkway that steals the spotlight in Asheville. The 469-mile road carves through a mesmerizing landscape of lush foliage, crowned by t…

A list that Memphis

Image
Is glad to be included in. This is a list of mid-size cities, so some of the usual suspects are excluded. From CBSNews.com.
7 best cities for job seekers in 2017
6. Memphis

The Southern city, which has about 1.3 million residents in its metropolitan region, currently offers more than 42,300 job openings. Top employers include FedEx (FDX) and International Paper (IP).
The median base salary is $41,200. While that may seem low, the median home value stands at just $119,700, at the bottom of the seven best cities for job seekers.  The type of jobs that are available in Memphis include software engineer, physical therapist and maintenance technician.

Infographic Friday

Image
by NowSourcing.
From Visually.

At the TACHE Conference in Memphis

At the TACHE Conference

Image

Happy National Shot Day!

Image
Embedded from BestInfographics.co

Gaming the system?

Image
Fueled by Tennessee Promise students, Cumberland University see rapid enrollment growth. Growth at many Nashville-area colleges shows that Nashville is booming. Although now that public universities all have their own governing boards, I wonder if state universities will be allowed to offer associate degrees in the future? From The Tennessean.
At Cumberland University, explosive growth offers a case study for a regional trend
On Monday, the university announced that enrollment had surged by nearly 50 percent since he started as president in the fall of 2015.  This semester's enrollment of 2,314 students represents an all-time high for the school.  Stumb said the jump was the result of targeted efforts to entice specific groups of students.  They've added new sports like archery, track and men's volleyball to attract more athletes. They're working with a nonprofit to recruit more students using Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a federal program for young people wh…

Mama, don't let your babies grow up

Image
In West Tennessee. Jackson is number 25 on this list and Memphis is number 20. From MSN.com.

Worst Cities to Raise Children
In a country as large and diverse as the United States, not all areas are equal when it comes to raising children. While the number of factors that can affect a child's development is seemingly limitless, there are a few core measures related to safety, school district quality, and amenities that can make all the difference between one area and another. And in some parts of the country, children are at a considerable disadvantage.  24/7 Wall St. created an index to identify the 25 worst U.S. metro areas in which to raise a child. All but two cities on this list are located in the either the western or southern United States.  The ideal city in which to raise children should be safe and have quality schools and plenty of recreational amenities. Only metro areas with some combination of high violent crime rates, low preschool enrollment rates, low high school gr…

Infographic Friday

Image
Embedded from Bluebird Care

Eight days a week

Image
Is just enough to let go your cares. Initially,I was intrigued by the Journal of Happiness Studies mentioned below. Does that mean happiness studies is a academic major somewhere? Could I have doubled-majored in happiness and leisure studies? Seriously, though, don't cut your vacations short. From Lifehacker.
Why Relaxing Vacations Should Be at Least Eight Days Long Sometimes a quick vacation is better than nothing, but if you can swing it, try for at least eight days. Research suggests you need at least that much time to truly unwind and feel refreshed.  The research, published in the Journal of Happiness Studies, suggests that your feelings of happiness and personal well-being rapidly increase as soon as you take that break from the rat race. Then, your relaxation and positive vibes peak on day eight of your getaway, maximizing your feelings of contentment. After that, your enjoyment slowly fades away until day 11, where you’re likely to experience a severe drop-off—maybe due to …

November is National Diabetes Month

Image
From Visually. - See more at: http://visual.ly/national-diabetes-month-november#sthash.Mo7jXIo3.dpuf

Happy Halloween!

Image
[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]

Happy Halloween

Image
Image Created by HalloweenCostumes.com

How to dress as Spider-Man tomorrow

Image
Infographic Created by HalloweenCostumes.com

Infographic Friday

Image
From Visually.

Save the date

Image
ACHE South Annual Conference

At the ACHE Conference in Portland. ACHE South is in Austin this spring.

Image
by SpareFoot.
From Visually.

Our sessions at the ACHE Conference

Image
4.3  Leadership Southern Style
This session will focus on leadership lessons learned from the combined 75+ years of continuing education experience found in this panel of former ACHE South Chairs. Moderated by another former ACHE South Chair and current ACHE Board member, the topics for discussion include opinions on the state of continuing higher education nationwide, anticipating changes in the continuing higher education landscape, positioning yourself for advancement (in the field and in higher education), and meeting the challenges of leadership in your units--whether you have the title of leader or not. The panelists will share some successes, some failures, and some things on the horizon.  Dr. Rick Osborn, East Tennessee State University
Dr. Brian Van Horn, Murray State University
Dr. Susan A. Elkins, University of South Carolina – Palmetto College
Dr. Amy Johnson, East Tennessee State University

At the ACHE Conference in Portland

Image

At the ACHE Conference in Portland

Image

Infographic Friday

Image
From Visually.

Virginia's is Natural Bridge

Image
Been there. According to Travel + Leisure, the most romantic place in Tennessee is...
The Most Romantic Destination in Every State Tennessee — Clingman’s Dome If love is raising you higher, head to the highest point in all of Tennessee. At 6,643 feet, Clingman’s Dome is one of the most spectacular viewpoints in the Great Smoky Mountains. On clear days, it’s possible to see up to 100 miles from a full 360° from the structure.

And number 12 could be

Image
Just do your damn job. With no drama. From Time.

11 Easy Ways to Become Your Boss' Favorite Employee
Every manager and every workplace is different, but speaking generally, the best way to get your boss to like you is to do great work.  That said, if you're looking to really bowl them over — and potentially even become their favorite team member — there are a few simple strategies you can use.  Business Insider looked into scientific research and expert opinion and came up with 11 tricks to help you wow the higher-ups. Try to solve problems on your own In his 1948 book "How to Stop Worrying and Start Living," Dale Carnegie includes an anecdote about Leon Shimkin, who was then a general manager at publishing house Simon and Schuster.  Shimkin told Carnegie that he'd devised a way to drastically cut meeting times: He informed his team that they couldn't present any problems unless they'd first tried to think of a solution.  Impress your boss with your proble…

The Great Recession's

Image
Staggering hit on higher education. State spending on higher education still much behind 2008 levels. From The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

A Lost Decade in Higher Education Funding State Cuts Have Driven Up Tuition and Reduced Quality
A decade since the Great Recession hit, state spending on public colleges and universities remains well below historic levels, despite recent increases. Overall state funding for public two- and four-year colleges in the 2017 school year (that is, the school year ending in 2017) was nearly $9 billion below its 2008 level, after adjusting for inflation. . . .The funding decline has contributed to higher tuition and reduced quality on campuses as colleges have had to balance budgets by reducing faculty, limiting course offerings, and in some cases closing campuses. At a time when the benefit of a college education has never been greater, state policymakers have made going to college less affordable and less accessible to the students most in nee…

The top 20

Image
Community colleges for adult learners, according to the Washington Monthly.

Best Colleges for Adult Learners - 2 Year Colleges

1. Weber State (Utah)

2. Utah Valley U.

3. Foothill College (Calif.)

4. Central Texas College

5. Raritan Valley Community College (N.J.)

6. Columbia College (Mo.)

7. Howard Community College (Md.)

8. Renton Technical College (Wash.)

9. Montgomery College (Md.)

10. Capital Community College (Conn.)

11. Lakeshore Technical College (Wis.)

12. Inver Hills Community College (Minn.)

13. Gateway Community College (Ariz.)

14. Fox Valley Technical College-Appleton (Wis.)

15. Montgomery County Community College (Pa.)

16. Diablo Valley College (Calif.)

17. Oakton Community College (Ill.)

18. Quincy College (Mass.)

19. City College of San Francisco (Calif.)

20. Mesa Community College (Ariz.)

Infographic Friday

Image
From Visually.

Stemming the tide

Image
Of low liberal arts salaries. Just you wait. From CBSnews.com.
Does a liberal arts degree lead to low pay? Not necessarily To be sure, liberal arts graduates earn less out of the gate. Princeton graduates with degrees in the humanities such as English, philosophy or foreign languages report earning an average $61,500 within five years or graduation, the most of any university.  Yet after ten years or more of workplace experience, they typically earn an average of $134,100. Graduates of the Ivy League university who major in social sciences such as economics, history or anthropology are paid an average of $68,100 when starting their careers. But a decade after graduation, they typically earn $176,600.  It's not only Ivy League graduates who end up with healthy paychecks over their careers, PayScale said. "You might assume that the highest earners in the country come from well-known Ivy League Schools like Harvard or Princeton, but the truth is, the highest median alumni salarie…

First I heard of

Image
Tuition insurance. It appears to mostly cover CBSnews.com. dropping out because of illness. Maybe grade insurance is on the horizen. From

What is tuition insurance and do you need it? Paying for college is one of the biggest financial investments you can make.  According to the College Board, the average undergraduate budget at a private four-year college is a staggering $49,320 for the 2016-2017 school year. Public universities aren't much better; expect to pay $39,890 for out-of-state students or $24,610 for in-state students.  But just as you would protect your home or car purchase with insurance, you can get tuition insurance to protect your investment in education. Below, we answer all your questions about tuition insurance, from what it covers to whether it's worth getting.