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Showing posts from 2017

The top 20

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Community colleges for adult learners, according to the Washington Monthly.

Best Colleges for Adult Learners - 2 Year Colleges

1. Weber State (Utah)

2. Utah Valley U.

3. Foothill College (Calif.)

4. Central Texas College

5. Raritan Valley Community College (N.J.)

6. Columbia College (Mo.)

7. Howard Community College (Md.)

8. Renton Technical College (Wash.)

9. Montgomery College (Md.)

10. Capital Community College (Conn.)

11. Lakeshore Technical College (Wis.)

12. Inver Hills Community College (Minn.)

13. Gateway Community College (Ariz.)

14. Fox Valley Technical College-Appleton (Wis.)

15. Montgomery County Community College (Pa.)

16. Diablo Valley College (Calif.)

17. Oakton Community College (Ill.)

18. Quincy College (Mass.)

19. City College of San Francisco (Calif.)

20. Mesa Community College (Ariz.)

Infographic Friday

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From Visually.

Stemming the tide

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Of low liberal arts salaries. Just you wait. From CBSnews.com.
Does a liberal arts degree lead to low pay? Not necessarily To be sure, liberal arts graduates earn less out of the gate. Princeton graduates with degrees in the humanities such as English, philosophy or foreign languages report earning an average $61,500 within five years or graduation, the most of any university.  Yet after ten years or more of workplace experience, they typically earn an average of $134,100. Graduates of the Ivy League university who major in social sciences such as economics, history or anthropology are paid an average of $68,100 when starting their careers. But a decade after graduation, they typically earn $176,600.  It's not only Ivy League graduates who end up with healthy paychecks over their careers, PayScale said. "You might assume that the highest earners in the country come from well-known Ivy League Schools like Harvard or Princeton, but the truth is, the highest median alumni salarie…

First I heard of

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Tuition insurance. It appears to mostly cover CBSnews.com. dropping out because of illness. Maybe grade insurance is on the horizen. From

What is tuition insurance and do you need it? Paying for college is one of the biggest financial investments you can make.  According to the College Board, the average undergraduate budget at a private four-year college is a staggering $49,320 for the 2016-2017 school year. Public universities aren't much better; expect to pay $39,890 for out-of-state students or $24,610 for in-state students.  But just as you would protect your home or car purchase with insurance, you can get tuition insurance to protect your investment in education. Below, we answer all your questions about tuition insurance, from what it covers to whether it's worth getting.

Meanwhile, just over the mountains in North Carolina

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Bigfoot. Yes, Bigfoot. Everyone carries a phone now and yet no photos of ufos, Bigfoot, or other creatures ever show up. From WYFF4.com.
Bigfoot hunters spot legendary, hairy creature in WNC, Carolina group says
If you thought Bigfoot never ventured down South, think again.  Members of a group calling themselves Bigfoot 911 claim they spotted the giant, walking, bear-like, legendary creature in the woods of Western North Carolina Friday night.  John E. Bruner posted on the Marion group's Facebook page (it's a closed group page) that the expedition in McDowell County "hit pay dirt" just before 11 p.m. The sighting came after three teams set up glow sticks at various locations, Bruner said.  He describes how they heard movement in the woods, three steps at a time, and the creature came into view near a glow stick about 30 yards away.  "The angle of the moon was shining straight down on the road and something big stepped into view," Bruner said. "I turned …

My hometown and its college

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My alma mater--is on this list. Not surprising since I know someone who bought a house at auction for $100, albeit a fixer-upper. True story. Not that I would move back, you understand. Charleston, Illinois, is also on the list. As are Fort Valley, Georgia, and Orangeburg, South Carolina. From CBSnews.com.

The 10 most affordable U.S. college towns
7. Macomb, Illinois Median home price: $104,500  Student population: 40.3 percent  Macomb, Illinois, is down four spots this year from its third-place spot in 2015, with a median home price increase of $3,600. It's home to Western Illinois University, which was established in 1902, and is tied as the No. 9 top public university in the Midwest (with the University of Wisconsin Whitewater), according to the 2017 Best Colleges ranking from U.S. News and World Report. Macomb is about 70 miles west of Peoria, Illinois.

Infographic Friday

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The most beautiful place in Tennessee?

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No surprises here. Nearby in the most beautiful place in North Carolina: the Blue Ridge Parkway. From MSN.com.

The Most Beautiful Place in Every U.S. State
TENNESSEE: GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

Happy National Vodka Day!

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From Visually.

I might have thought the best book based in Tennessee

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Would be A Death in the Family. Or The Firm. From Travel+Leisure.
The Best Books Based in Every State
Tennessee: The Silence of the Lambs  Clarice Starling is an FBI trainee on an assignment to interview Dr. Hannibal Lecter about a killer named “Buffalo Bill.” While Thomas Harris' novel takes place in several states, including West Virginia and Maryland, it is Tennessee where some of the most engaging scenes with Lecter takes place.

Tennessee Alliance for Continuing Higher Education

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To register Click Here

Happy National Coffee Day!

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Embedded from BestInfographics.co

When free tuition

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Isn't really free. Tennessee continues as the benchmark. By Robert Kelchen, writing in Washington Monthly.

Not-so-Free College and the Disappointment Effect
But free college programs in the public sector often come with a key limitation—the amount of money that the state has to fund the program in a given year. Tennessee largely avoided this concern by endowing the Tennessee Promise program through lottery funds, and the program appears to be in good financial shape at this point. However, two other states are finding that available funds are insufficient to meet program demand.
Oregon will provide only $40 million of the $48 million needed to fund its nearly tuition-free community college program (which requires a $50 student copay). As a result, the state will eliminate grants to the 15% to 20% of students with the highest expected family contributions (a very rough proxy for ability to pay). New York received 75,000 completed applications for its tuition-free public college progr…

Happy World Tourism Day!

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Which Country Fits Your Manners? [Infographic] by the team at NeoMam

Another ranking of college towns

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Although there's no Tennessee town in this list, there are a few nearby: Athens, Blacksburg, Charlottesville. I've been to most of these some time or another throughout my career, although Fargo is a notable exception. Fargo? Yeah, it's on the list. So's my alma mater. From MSN.Com.

The 20 best college towns in America
Boulder, Colorado, is the top-ranked college town in the US, according to a new list from the American Institute for Economic Research.  The city of roughly 200,000 (for its metro area population) earned the top spot thanks to its accessibility — more than 20% of commuters take public transportation or cycle around Boulder Creek Corridor — and diverse and educated population.  Boulder also has an active bar-and-restaurant scene, with plenty of coffee shops and microbreweries.
AIER compiled its list using nine economic, demographic, and quality-of-life factors. It defines college towns as having fewer than 250,000 residents.
Aside from the overall ranking,…

Tennnesee Promise students succeeding

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Paving the way for the Drive to 55. From The Tennessean.
Tennessee Promise students more likely to succeed in college, less likely to drop out, new data shows
Students using Tennessee's free community college scholarship are significantly more likely to succeed in college than their peers outside the program, according to data released Thursday.  Fifty-six percent of Tennessee Promise students who entered college in 2015, the program's first year, had graduated, transferred to a four-year university or remained in school two years later. Only 39 percent of recent high school graduates outside of Tennessee Promise had done the same — a difference of 17 percentage points.  The data, part of a wide-ranging analysis done by the state's community college system, the Tennessee Board of Regents, provide the clearest picture yet of the landmark program.  Proposed by Gov. Bill Haslam in 2014, the program was the first in the nation to offer almost every graduating high school senior…

Happy National Comic Book Day!

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From Visually.

Infographic Friday

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From Visually.

Looking to retire

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In a college town? AARP lists ten good choices. One of the closer ones is in South Carolina. And I know the Chancellor, there.

10 Great Places to Live and Learn
Beaufort, S.C.  Beaufort is a textbook example of moss-covered antebellum architecture and Southern charm. Home to the University of South Carolina, Beaufort, it has about 70 sites on the National Register of Historic Places, not including part of the downtown, which is itself listed as a historic district. Beaufort is also known as an art town, with a host of museums and galleries. Anyone 60 and older who isn't working full time gets free tuition at USCB's two campuses. The university has one of the country's biggest OLLI programs, with 1,600 members and 400 classes and programs annually.  Population: 13,130. Institution: USC, Beaufort. Median home: $226,600. Median monthly rental: $1,648.

Stuck on the last line for your emails?

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Try thanking the reader. From Money.

This Is the ONLY Way You Should Sign Your Emails
But is there a right way to end an email? Turns out, there totally is. And it's how you should sign every email, experts say. Just write “thanks.”  The logic is simple. “Thanks” doesn’t come across as stiff, or cloying. It's appropriate for practically every type of exchange — you can use it to end a note to any level, department, or role at your company. And, importantly, it's more likely to get a response than any other kind of signature.  Earlier this year, email scheduling app Boomerang analyzed more 350,000 email threads to see which “closings” got the best response rates. Sign offs that included some variation of “thanks” got a response 62% of the time, compared to a 46% for emails that lacked “thankful” closings.“Closing an email with gratitude is a good bet, especially when you are requesting information or hoping to get someone to respond to your email,” says Brendan Greenley, a d…

The most beautiful campus in Tennessee?

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Also the most expensive. From Travel + Leisure.

The Most Beautiful College in Every State
Vanderbilt University in Tennessee Rural and stunning Sewanee was a close runner-up, but Vanderbilt is just too gorgeous to pass by. Impeccable grounds and landscaping, most obvious in places like Alumni Lawn and Bishops Commons, set the campus apart. Majestic columns (on display at the Wyatt Center) and clean red-brick facades add to the school’s impressive beauty.

Good news for English majors

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Liberal arts degrees may lead to more fulfilling, and ultimately more lucrative, careers down the line. And they're appealing to first generation college students. From The Atlantic.
The Unexpected Value of the Liberal Arts
Look more closely, though, and this old stereotype is starting to crumble. In 2016, the National Association of Colleges and Employers surveyed 5,013 graduating seniors about their family backgrounds and academic paths. The students most likely to major in the humanities or social sciences—33.8 percent of them—were those who were the first generation in their family ever to have earned college degrees. By contrast, students whose parents or other forbears had completed college chose the humanities or social sciences 30.4 percent of the time.

Pursuing the liberal-arts track isn’t a quick path to riches. First-job salaries tend to be lower than what’s available with vocational degrees in fields such as nursing, accounting, or computer science. That’s especially tr…

Infographic Friday

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Courtesy of: Visual.ly via TechGYD

The higher education bubble?

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Slowly deflating? Maybe, but this article points out that the most rapidly shrinking section of higher education is the for-profit sector. That's probably a good thing. From The Atlantic.
This Is the Way the College ‘Bubble’ Ends For the past few decades, the unstoppable increase in college tuition has been a fact of life, like death and taxes. The sticker price of American college increased nearly 400 percent in the last 30 years, while median household income growth was relatively flat. Student debt soared to more than $1 trillion, the result of loans to cover the difference.  Several people—with varying degrees of expertise in higher-ed economics—have predicted that it’s all a bubble, destined to burst. Now after decades of expansion, just about every meaningful statistic—including the number of college students, the growth of tuition costs, and even the total number of colleges—is going down, or at least growing more slowly.  First, the annual growth rate of college tuition is …

Save the date!

79th Annual ACHE Conference and Meeting Imagine October 23-25, 2017 Doubletree by Hilton Portland Portland, Oregon


Looking to move to a big city?

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Maybe think twice about Memphis. Also on the list of cities to avoid is Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Orlando, and Rockford. Rockford? I should add that I had a great visit to Memphis this past spring. From Shebudgets.com.
20 US Cities You Do Not Want To Live In
Memphis, Tennessee  It’s one of the most famous places in the south, and people would love to live here. It’s close enough to Nashville to be near the stars, but far enough away to be relatively comfortable. However, the crime rate here is very high. This is not a huge city in comparison with other cities in the country, but you wouldn’t know it by looking at the crime rate and the number of violent crimes that are reported each year. Additionally, the numbers are not falling with time.

ETSU designated ‘adult friendly’ institution

East Tennessee State University has been designated an “Adult Friendly Institution” by the Coalition of Adult Learning Focused Institutions. 

The coalition is sponsored by the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning and includes about 70 institutions nationwide that strive to advance programs and services for adult students, evaluate their adult degree programs and share best practices. In becoming part of the coalition, ETSU is demonstrating its commitment to offering specialized services to meet the unique needs of adult students.

“We’re really proud of this designation,” said Dr. Richard Osborn, dean of Continuing Studies and Academic Outreach at ETSU. “The university worked hard for over a year to earn it. Adult students can be confident that ETSU constantly works to ensure that they are successful.”

Adult, Commuter and Transfer Services (ACTS) at ETSU offers assistance for adult and transfer students returning to college. ACTS staff understand adult students’ specific needs …

Infographic Friday

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The pool of high school graduates

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Keeps shrinking. Some states, like Georgia, are an exception but nationwide, the picture looks grim for small colleges and universities. From The Hechinger Report.
Universities and colleges struggle to stem big drops in enrollment
All of these changes are a response to a crisis few outside higher education even know exists: a sharp drop in the number of customers bound for small private, nonprofit colleges like this in particular, and also some public universities and other higher-education institutions.

A dip in the birth rate means there are fewer 18- to 24-year olds leaving high schools, especially in the Midwest and Northeast. This has coincided with an even more precipitous decline in the number of students older than 24, who experts say have been drawn back into the workforce as the economy improves, dragging down enrollment at community colleges and private, for-profit universities that provide mid-career education.  The result is that the number of students in colleges and unive…

Thoughts on jargon

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Highlighting three of the more overused phrases. From The Open Forum.
THE HISTORY OF JARGON
Low-Hanging Fruit  The expression "low-hanging fruit" is also among the top most irritating office lingo that showed up in surveys.  "Low-hanging fruit" refers to what's easily achievable without much effort. This expression first appeared as early as the 17th century in various poetic or literary works as a vivid metaphor. According to Investopedia, the exact phrase "low-hanging fruit" likely first appeared in print in a 1968 article in the Guardian newspaper, gaining popularity in the following decades, and "becoming a staple in corporate management and sales lingo" by the early 1990s. It even appeared in a 2009 Dilbert cartoon as an example of "the vacuous way managers speak."  In 2016, writer Zack Crockett authored an article on Priceonomics showing the explosion in usage of this expression. But his research shows that the expression has n…
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Happy Labor Day!

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Infographic Friday

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Looking back

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My good grades may have been a fluke! Like taller people are more successful, good looking students earn better grades. From The Pacific Standard.
ATTRACTIVE STUDENTS GET HIGHER GRADES
In the latest attempt to tease out the benefits of being beautiful, two researchers examined the academic records of students at a large American university. They compared the grades they received in online courses—ones in which the teachers never saw their faces—with those conducted in person.  "More attractive students earn higher grades when they are seen than when they are not seen," report economists Rey Hernandez-Julian and Christina Peters of the Metropolitan State University of Denver. This result, they add, was "driven mainly by courses taught by male instructors."  Hey, your paper may be a C-minus, but your cheekbones are A-plus.  As we have ruefully noted over the years, researchers have consistently found good-looking people are treated better than the rest of us. They ten…

Vanderbilt is the 9th

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Hardest college to get into. Hardly a surprise. The hardest is California Institute of Technology. From Niche.com. Go here to see the list as a map.

2017 Hardest Colleges to Get Into in America
Explore the hardest colleges to get into ranking based on acceptance rates and SAT/ACT test scores using data from the U.S. Department of Education. Compare the most selective colleges with the lowest acceptance rates and highest SAT/ACT test scores

Murfreesboro, Tennessee

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Is one of the fastest growing cities in the county. Greenville, South Carolina--just across the mountains from here--is listed as well. Unsurprisingly, nearly all are in the South and several in Texas. From CNN.Com.
These are the fastest-growing cities in the U.S.
Murfreesboro, Tennessee Population increase: 4.7%
Murfreesboro sits roughly 35 miles from Nashville, and has seen home values rise 12.5% in the past year, according to Zillow.

Infographic Friday

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Save the date!

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Tennessee Alliance for Continuing Higher Education  Annual Conference "All Shook Up" November 8-10, 2017 Memphis, Tennessee

This is now in the job description

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For deans of continuing education. As well as other deans. This is one of the biggest changes I've seen in the field. From The Chronicle of Higher Education.
What Every Dean Needs to Know About Fund Raising
"There’s only so much you can squeeze out of tuition," says James W. Dicker, vice president for advancement at Temple University. The expectation that fund raising will be a significant part of deans’ jobs will only grow, he says. Now, that expectation is often made clear upfront. At Temple, for instance, Mr. Dicker met with candidates for dean positions in Temple’s law and art schools during the selection process.  Yet courting donors is not always a natural fit for deans. Academic leaders may have very different skill sets than the ones that make development professionals successful. They are used to imparting their knowledge and sharing their expertise. But good fund raising depends on listening to donors and asking the right questions to understand their motivation…

Even we English majors

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Made fun of philosophy majors. But Katy Tur makes the case for not only philosophy, but the liberal arts in general. From NBCNews.com.
Katy Tur on Her Philosophy Degree: ‘It Allows Me to Ask Questions’ Katy Tur's advice for undergrads studying philosophy? Don't let anyone tell you your major isn't useful.  "I graduated with a B.A. in philosophy and it was by far the best major I could have taken in college," the NBC News correspondent, a graduate of the University of California Santa Barbara, explained in an interview for College Game Plan.  "A lot of people in this business take journalism as a major. Others take communications," she explained.
For Tur, philosophy offered something different — something she utilizes daily while covering the Trump administration.  "It allows me to ask questions, and that is what I do every day," said Tur.

Happy National Senior CItizen Day!

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Find more great infographics on NerdGraph Infographics

Infographic Friday

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Brought to you by MPH@GW: online mph

Three states get a pass

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Kentucky, Tennessee, and...Indiana. Indiana? Honorable mentions go to North Carolina's Blue Ridge and South Carolina's High Wire. From Esquire.
THE BEST WHISKEYS IN EVERY STATE RIGHT NOW
A whole lot of people think bourbon can only legally be made in Kentucky. That's not true. But the oft-repeated myth shows how indelible the relationship between Kentucky and bourbon is, a relationship that dates back to Alexander Hamilton and a despised whiskey tax that drove distillers from the mid-Atlantic region to the friendlier Southern state.  The absolute best whiskey in America still comes out of Kentucky, whether you believe it is Pappy Van Winkle, George T. Stagg, or perhaps a more offbeat selection. Likewise, Jack Daniels is, if not the best, the most famous whiskey in America, and the best-selling too. Jack has stamped Kentucky's neighbor to the south, Tennessee, as another state uniquely linked with the good stuff.  But what about whiskeys from other states? Are any worth …

Happy National Rum Day!

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From Visually.

The top cities for college grads

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Include Houston (#1) and Dallas (#5) in Texas. I might have thought Nashville or Charlotte might have made the list. From CBS Money Watch.
5 U.S. cities where college grads can thrive Ah, spring -- the weather warms, the future brightens and an army of freshly minted college graduates fans out across America to apply their dreams and degrees to the working world. Whether those dreams take flight or crash to the ground depends, of course, on the individual. But the location where that person chooses to live can play a significant role.  To that end, Bankrate analyzed the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. to see how conducive they are to launching young careers. "It's important to remember your job isn't your life. You want to be happy where you are, and you want to be able to afford where you're living," said Sarah Berger, who writes about finance and budgeting for Bankrate under the moniker The Cashlorette.

The Dark Triad?

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Sounds like a run-down bar from Harry Potter. Still, is it any wonder psychopaths are drawn to study business? Marketing seems a natural fit. But, it's another study from outside the U.S. From MSN.Com.
Psychopaths Are Most Likely To Study This In College
Psychopathy is a real mental health condition that often goes undetected in people, which means you could be living next to, or with, a psychopath and not even know it. So how do you tell a psychopath from your average Joe? Well, according to a new study, it may help to see what they studied in college; psychopaths are more likely to be into business courses.   The study, published online in Personality and Individual Differences, found that individuals with the Dark Triad traits (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism) are more likely to have studied business and economics. These results show that your personality, particularly having a “dark” personality, may influence your educational choices.  The findings are based on a…

Happy National Left Hander's Day!

Infographic Friday

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Image source: Protection1.com


Win early

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Lose late. The grain of salt taken with this study is that it looks at outcomes in Europe, not the U.S. Still, this is what we liberal arts graduates always preach. From The Atlantic.
The Downside to Career and Technical Education Yet new international research points to a significant downside of such programs: Students may benefit early in their careers, but are harmed later in life as the economy changes and they lack the general skills necessary to adapt.  The study raises concerns about the trade-offs that could come with significantly expanding career and technical training in the United States—at least any version that substitutes for broad knowledge and skills transferable across jobs.  “Individuals with general education initially face worse employment outcomes but experience improved employment probability as they become older relative to individuals with vocational education,” write four researchers in the study, which appeared in the winter 2017 issue of the peer-reviewed Jo…

Tennessee Alliance for Continuing Higher Education

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To register Click Here

Those zany Millennials

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Maybe all they really want is job security. Who doesn't? From CBSNews.com.
What millennials really want in the workplace
Different surveys have widely varying opinions on the millennial generation -- those between the ages of 18 and 30 who are entering or already in the workforce. Some imply this is a group of slackers living in their parents' basements. Others show them as ambitious, hardworking and struggling to pay off college debt with several part-time jobs.  How do they see themselves? A new report from the blog Squared Away shows a lot of "youthful optimism" among this generation. But is it justified?  "The changing job market is making it increasingly difficult for young adults to get their careers off to the right start," said Kim Blanton, writer and editor for Squared Away at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.  That's because the employment landscape is changing. Millennials are often accused of changing jobs just to earn mor…

Save the date!

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Happy National Lighthouse Day!

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From Visually.